Profile


Q. S. Tong joined the University of Hong Kong in 1992. He has been a research fellow at Harvard University and is an adjunct professor of English at Nanjing University, China. His research interests include romanticism, critical theory, and cross-cultural and comparative studies. His current research focuses on the formation of the English idea of China in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He is the author of Reconstructing Romanticism (1997) and numerous articles, in both English and Chinese, on literature, language, culture and society. He has been invited to edit special issues for scholarly journals and is an editorial member of several international journals. He is a founding co-editor of Critical Zone: A Forum of Chinese and Western Knowledge, jointly published by the University of Hong Kong Press and Nanjing University Press.

 

Courses taught in 2014-15:

ENGL2075       The idea of China

 

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Publications


Edited volumes

2011

China after Thirty Years of Reform: Critical Reflections, a special issue of boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture 38:1 (Spring 2011)(Duke University Press), co-edited with Jiwei Ci, pp.237. <http://boundary2.dukejournals.org/content/vol38/issue1/>

 

2008

Critical Zone: A Forum of Chinese and Western Knowledge (3) (co-edited with Douglas Kerr and Wang Shouren), University of Hong Kong Press and Nanjing University Press, 2006, 307 pp.236.

 

2006

Critical Zone: A Forum of Chinese and Western Knowledge (2) (co-edited with Wang Shouren and Douglas Kerr), University of Hong Kong Press and Nanjing University Press, 2006, 307 pp.

 

2004

Critical Zone: A Forum of Chinese and Western Knowledge (1) (co-edited with Wang Shouren and Douglas Kerr), University of Hong Kong Press and Nanjing University Press, 2004, 232 pp.

Essays

2010

“Global Modernity and Linguistic Universality: The Invention of Modern Chinese Language,” Eighteenth Century Studies  (Johns Hopkins UP), vol,. 43, no. 3, 325 – 39.

 

2009

Reprint of  “Comparative Literature in China” (with Zhou Xiaoyi), in The Princeton Sourcebook in Comparative Literature: From the European Enlightenment to the Global Present, eds by David Damrosch, Natalie Melas & Mbongiseni Buthelezi (Princeton: Princeton University Press).

 

2009

《知識的貧困和貧困的知識:西方漢語觀的生成和發展》(Poverty of knowledge: the genesis and development of western views on the Chinese language), 《國際漢學》International Sinology), 114 - 29.

 

2009

“Guo Songtao in London: An Unaccomplished Mission of Discovery,” in China Abroad: Travels, Subjects, Spaces, eds. Elaine Ho and Julia Kuehn (The University of Hong Kong Press), 45 –62.

 

2009

“Cultural Policy in China,” in Encyclopedia of Modern China, eds David Pong, Julia F. Andrews, Jean-Philippe Beja, Flemming Christiansen, David Faure, and Antonia Finnane, 4 vols, Detroit: Charles Scribner's Sons.

 

2007

Between knowledge and “plagiarism,” or, how the Chinese language was studied in the West, Language Sciences, 30/5 (2007).

 

2007

“Traveling Imperialism: Lord Elgin’s Missions to China and the Limits of Victorian Liberalism,” in A Century of Travels in China: Critical Essays on Travel Writing from the 1840s to the 1940s, eds. Douglas Kerr and Julia Kuehn(Hong Kong: University of Hong Kong Press), 39 -51, 185 – 188.

 

2007

“‘To Be Worthy of the Suffering and Survival’: Chinese Memoirs and the Politics of Sympathy,” in Life Writing (Routledge), vol. 4, no. 1 (April 2007) (with Ruth YY Hung), 59 – 79.

 

2007

“The End of Aesthetics and the Limits of Liberalism,” in Tradition and Modernity: Comparative Perspectives, eds. Kang-i Sun Chang and Meng Hua (Beijing: Peking University Press), 19 – 47.

 

2006

"The Aesthetic of Imperial Ruins: The Elgins and John Bowring,” boundary 2: an international journal of literature and culture, 33, no. 1 (Spring 2006), Duke University Press, 124 - 150.

 

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Last updated: 15 December 2014