Topics


Wk

Date

Topic

1

Sept. 6

Introduction
Text for discussion: The Universal Declaration of Human Rights

2

Sept. 13

History of an idea
Required reading: Immanuel Kant, “Idea for a Universal History with Cosmopolitan Intent”

3

Sept. 20

Critique of nationalism and the nation state
Required reading: Giorgio Agamben, “Beyond Human Rights”

4

Sept. 27

Rethinking the national.
Required reading: K. Anthony Appiah, “Cosmopolitan Patriots”

5

Oct. 4

Cosmopolitan visions
Required reading: Catherine Lu, “The One and Many Faces of Cosmopolitanism”

6

Oct. 11

Cosmopolitan lives
Required readings: Scott L. Malcomson, “The Varieties of Cosmopolitan Experience”

7

Oct. 18

Reading Week – No Class

8

Oct. 25

Cosmopolitan locations
Required reading: Ackbar Abbas, “Cosmopolitan De-scriptions: Shanghai and Hong Kong”

9

Nov. 1

World citizenship
Required reading: Janet Conway, “Citizenship in a Time of Empire”

10

Nov. 8

Cosmopolitan democracy
Required readings: David Held, “Principles of Cosmopolitan Order”

11 Nov. 15

Cosmopolitan culture
Required readings: K. Anthony Appiah, “Whose Culture Is It, Anyway?”

12

Nov. 22

Cosmopolitan community
Required readings: John Tomlinson, “The Possibility of Cosmopolitanism”

13

Nov. 29

Cosmopolitan Media
Required readings: John Perry Barlow "A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace”; Jon Katz’ "Birth of a Digital Nation“

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Objectives


This course aims to introduce students to historical and cross-cultural dimensions of a contemporary global awareness and to engage them in reflection and debate about the role of representation in the shaping of meaningful connections beyond the nation. It will thus also offer students opportunities to develop their analytical and critical skills and to practice the communication of their ideas in both spoken and written expression.

 

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Organisation


We will meet once a week for a two-hour and fifty-minute session. Sessions will include lectures introducing issues, texts and contexts for debate, as well as student-led discussions. Moodle will be used for the posting of teaching materials, discussions, and sharing of observations throughout the course.

Each student (or group, depending on class size) will lead discussion in the second half of each session. For this purpose, you will post a summary of the key ideas, arguments, or observations of the text on the program and a few questions for discussion on the course website three days before the meeting. Questions can address any aspect of the argument of the text (its claims, basis, logic, expression), its relation to other texts and arguments, as well as its relevance to specific situations or concerns.

Each student (or group) will post one short discussion report to the course website, within a week of the meeting concerned. The report should summarize the main ideas, issues and questions discussed and the main arguments or answers heard and engaged with.

 

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Assessment


Assessment will be continuous and based 100% on coursework including the following:

 

Active participation in weekly meetings and contributions to online discussions (including one presentation and discussion report)

30%

 

Short essay
Discussion of a given topic in approx. 1,500 words, due Oct. 9

30%

 

Long essay
Discussion of a given topic in approx. 2,000 words, due Dec 9

40%

 

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Texts


The emphasis of this course is on reading and engaging with critical arguments. For each session and topic, required and recommended reading will be specified. All of these texts will be accessible either online or on reserve (as a master copy) in the School Office. Further reading will be suggested in a separate bibliography posted on the course website on Moodle. You are welcome to suggest additions to the readings and upload illustrative material to the course website.

 

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Last updated: 29 August 2016