Topics


  1. What does ‘legal language’ mean?
  2. The specialised vocabulary and grammar of legal language
  3. Legal text types
  4. Drafting and interpreting the law
  5. The role of language in legal authority
  6. Language use in the courts
  7. How advocates persuade
  8. Linguistic analysis as legal evidence
  9. Language, law, and contemporary media
  10. Legal bilingualism and multilingualism

 

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Objectives


By the end of the course, students should have developed an appreciation of the texture, structures and functioning of legal language and acquired an understanding of state-of-the-art approaches to a wide range of critical issues that cut across legal and linguistic studies. They will have learnt to approach intellectual problems from multidisciplinary approaches and to reflect on how these approaches can complement each other. Their better understanding of language and justice is transferrable knowledge that can be usefully applied to other scholarly discourses both in law and humanities.

 

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Organisation


This course consists of a combination of interlinked lectures and workshops.

 

 

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Assessment


10%: Participation
60%: Problem-based Tasks
30%: Final test (in-class)

 

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Texts


Durant, A. and Leung, J. (2016) Language and Law. Routledge.

A list of recommended readings will also be provided.

 

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Last updated: 17 July 2017