Learning Outcomes


On completing the course, students will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an awareness of the function of literary representation as both shaped by concrete situations and shaping responses to such situations.
  2. Analyze and compare different conventions and strategies in the representation of place in literature and explain their significance in relation to environmental attitudes and values.
  3. Distinguish between different concepts and representations of the environment and point out their historical relationships to material and imaginary uses of places.
  4. Identify key issues in eco-criticism and trace their histories across different cultural traditions.
  5. Recognize distinct imaginary and institutional environments constituted by literature and engage in arguments about their relevance to society.

 

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Study Load


Activities

Number of hours

Lectures (incl in-class exercises)

18

Tutorials

12

Fieldwork/Visits

10

Reading/Self-study

60

Assessment: Essay/Report writing

30

Assessment: Tutorial participation

10

Total:

140

 

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Assessment


100% coursework

Assessment Tasks

Weighting

Short critical essay

35

Environmental report

30

Tutorial presentation, participation, and response

35

 

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Required Reading


A reader will be available containing extracts from a range of fiction and non-fiction.

These include extracts from poetry by Blake and Wordsworth, novels by Dickens, Hardy, Bruce Chatwin, Ian McEwan and Jeanette Winterson, and non-fiction by Raymond Williams, Barry Lopez and Jonathan Raban.

In addition, students should watch Guggenheim’s ‘An Inconvenient Truth (2006) .

 

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Last updated: 6 July 2015